Palindromes

Project Euler 125: Finding square sums that are palindromic

Project Euler 125: Finding square sums that are palindromic

Problem 125 of Project Euler deals with a property we have worked with before, palindromic numbers. The problem reads

The palindromic number 595 is interesting because it can be written as the sum of consecutive squares: 62 + 72 + 82 + 92 + 102 + 112 + 122.

There are exactly eleven palindromes below one-thousand that can be written as consecutive square sums, and the sum of these palindromes is 4164. Note that 1 = 02 + 12 has not been included as this problem is concerned with the squares of positive integers.

Find the sum of all the numbers less than 108 that are both palindromic and can be written as the sum of consecutive squares.

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Posted by Kristian in Project Euler, 3 comments
Project Euler 55: How many Lychrel numbers are there below ten-thousand?

Project Euler 55: How many Lychrel numbers are there below ten-thousand?

Problem 55 of Project Euler has a rather long description:

If we take 47, reverse and add, 47 + 74 = 121, which is palindromic.

Not all numbers produce palindromes so quickly. For example,

349 + 943 = 1292,
1292 + 2921 = 4213
4213 + 3124 = 7337

That is, 349 took three iterations to arrive at a palindrome.

Although no one has proved it yet, it is thought that some numbers, like 196, never produce a palindrome. A number that never forms a palindrome through the reverse and add process is called a Lychrel number. Due to the theoretical nature of these numbers, and for the purpose of this problem, we shall assume that a number is Lychrel until proven otherwise. In addition you are given that for every number below ten-thousand, it will either (i) become a palindrome in less than fifty iterations, or, (ii) no one, with all the computing power that exists, has managed so far to map it to a palindrome. In fact, 10677 is the first number to be shown to require over fifty iterations before producing a palindrome: 4668731596684224866951378664 (53 iterations, 28-digits).

Surprisingly, there are palindromic numbers that are themselves Lychrel numbers; the first example is 4994.

How many Lychrel numbers are there below ten-thousand?

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Posted by Kristian in Project Euler, 12 comments

Project Euler 36: Find the sum of all numbers less than one million, which are palindromic in base 10 and base 2

In Problem 36 of Project Euler we are revisiting palindromic numbers. This time with we need to find numbers which are not only palindromic in base 10 but also in base two, meaning in a binary representation. The problem description reads

The decimal number, 585 = 10010010012 (binary), is palindromic in both bases.

Find the sum of all numbers, less than one million, which are palindromic in base 10 and base 2.

(Please note that the palindromic number, in either base, may not include leading zeros.)

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Posted by Kristian in Project Euler, 14 comments

Project Euler – Problem 4

Today it is time to look at the solution to Problem 4 of Project Euler. It differs a bit in the nature of the problem from the first 3 we have looked at so far. However, it is still mathematics and a solution can still be coded, and most important it is still fun.

The problem formulation reads:

A palindromic number reads the same both ways. The largest palindrome made from the product of two 2-digit numbers is 9009 = 91 * 99.

Find the largest palindrome made from the product of two 3-digit numbers.

I think it is a nice recreational little exercise.

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Posted by Kristian in Project Euler, 28 comments